Untitled

Untitled

  • Donald Judd's Untitled Sculpture. Full description in body text.
  • Donald Judd's Untitled Sculpture. Full description in body text.
1982
Donald Judd
Corten steel. 7 1/3' h. x 7 1/3' w. x 14 2/3' d.
Photo Credit: 
Art on File, Seattle

 

In his sculpture Judd has championed a maximum clarity in form and material. He has rejected metaphysical and metaphoric speculations and has tried to emphasize what art can express as true. To him, that truth was accumulated through concrete experiences and perceptual issues. With his ongoing series of boxes, he has established the versatility of such a simple shape. In his work for Western, the exterior sides, as expected, are perpendicular to the open ends; however, the interior panels are on the diagonal, thereby creating an unusual sense of space. He sited the work on the lawn so that his sculpture frames at one end Old Main on the lawn and in the distance the Canadian Coastal Range.

In the seventies, Judd had begun to think more about how his art had similar subject-object relations peculiar to architecture. Yet, if his ''specific object'' could be occupied, was it necessarily a building? By the time he moved from the streets of New York City to the plains of Texas in 1976, he had created a full range of work that had no other concept but the literal space within the hollow-like box itself. Any relation­ ship would have to incorporate ''virtually the whole room or area outdoors. " When he came to Western in 1981, he first proposed a series of architecturally sealed, concrete boxes set one after the other on a knoll parallel to the walkway adjacent to the field track in south campus. He finally decided on one large Cor-ten box with open ends and with interior planes set on the diagonal to the box's perpendicular sides. He cited his Untitled (1982) work on the lawn of Old Main.''

Funding provided by

Gift from the Virginia Wright Fund. © Donald Judd Foundation. Licensed by VAGA, New York.

Audio interpretation of Untitled

 

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