Skyviewing Sculpture

1969
Isamu Noguchi
Painted iron plate. 14' h. x 17' w.
Photo Credit: 
Art on File, Seattle.

 

While Noguchi's sculpture can be described as a tilted cube with cutouts on three sides, its special qualities are weightlessness and its continuing sense of space. Rising on brick piers, the sculpture invites the viewer into its interior. Inside, the viewer can measure himself against the scale of the cube and sense the uplifting of the sculpture as he looks up and out towards the moving sky. Since in Japan the circular disk represents the sun and is a symbol of creation, and since the viewer is part of the sculpture, Noguchi provides here a subtle union of two creative forces - man and nature.

With poise and grace, Skyviewing Sculpture (1969) balances its cubic shape on three points above the pavement of Red Square. Noguchi, the creator of this sculpture that seems at times to float over the square, and Ibsen Nelsen, the architect who commissioned the work for this University space, had in common their admiration for an older model, the  Piazza di  San Marco in Venice. After a visit to Italy in 1949, Noguchi actually described this older Italian square as a ''gigantic drawing room where the outside permeates the inside.'' 

Funding provided by

Art allowance from Miller Hall construction funds. © The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum.

Audio interpretation of Skyviewing Sculpture

 

Western Gallery & sculpture tour on the campus map

View more sculptures