India

1976
Anthony Caro
Steel, rusted and varnished. 7 3/4' h. x 9 3/4 ' w.
Photo Credit: 
Sandra Lucke

 

Caro's sculpture relates to human scale and to architectural detail. There is a strong frontality to "India," like vertical planes of a door, panel or room divider. Yet each side gives dramatically different views. On one side organic lumps thrust diagonally against large planes. Caro was aware of the country of India's architecture encrusted with ever moving body parts of various deities and their attendants. But also important to his concept was the material of steel and the rolling mills involved in its process - lumps flattened to a slab, then a sheet.

When the art committee took over the selection of artists from the architects, the visiting artists were permitted to find their own site or context. If Anthony Caro is one of the few who did not actually visit the campus, one might question if his piece is placed to its best advantage and whether his work responds to the architectural environment. Despite his not siting the work himself, Caro has said, "I am pleased to hear that India is in an enclosed area, surrounded on three sides by buildings, but with the buildings sufficiently far away not to compete with it or obstruct the view. It [seems] as if the siting has been very sensitive." 

 

Funding provided by

Gift from the Virginia Wright Fund, 1977.

Audio interpretation of India

 

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