• Mark di Suvero's sculpture for Handel. Full description in body text.
  • Mark di Suvero's sculpture for Handel. Full description in body text.
  • Mark di Suvero's sculpture for Handel. Full description in body text.

For Handel

1975
Mark di Suvero
Painted steel. 27' h.
Photo Credit: 
Paul Brower

 

Di Suvero's knowledge of music and sensitivity to the relationship of art and architecture led him to create a soaring sculpture dedicated to the composer George Frederic Handel. Di Suvero's work rises not only from the roof of the rehearsal hall below but also projects beyond this roof/plaza and against a magnificent view of water, mountains and sky. Sometimes di Suvero is considered an "action sculptor" in the way he draws directly with the steel I- beams. In running his own truck cranes, in using his welding torch and in directing the blocks and cables, he attempts to build multi- dimensional structures which seem to overcome physical laws.

Di Suvero works with both the I-beams of modern buildings and the discarded materials of modern life. When he came to campus di Suvero found that a work he had been carrying around in his mind would fit the space of the newly reconstructed Music building and plaza. He has often stated that his sculptural ideas evolve in ''dreamtime ... pure music of the mind." He likes music, whether classical or jazz, because it is an example of disciplined emotion. He also can relate to the rigorous labor and challenges involved in the construction trade and engineering. Di Suvero's For Handel (1975) originally combined a hanging wooden platform or swinging bed with the steel girders of modern technology. The fact that the bed was removed soon after the sculpture was erected does not diminish the sculpture's impact or meaning.

Funding provided by

Gift from the Virginia Wright Fund, 1974; installation cost from Performing Arts Center construction funds.

Audio interpretation of For Handel

 

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