COVID-19 Symptom Attestation

The Gallery is only available for educational purposes to WWU faculty, staff, and students by appointment.
No outside visitors are permitted on campus during the Fall quarter.
Appointment hours are available from September 23 through November 20, 2020 during the following days/hours:

Mondays: 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Tuesdays & Wednesdays: 1 - 5 p.m.
Thursdays: 12-4

If you are a faculty, staff, or student interested in setting up an appointment to visit the Gallery, please email Tami Landis.

Joel Aparicio, Photography

orangey streaked sky, a pier, silhouette of a working boat
Wednesday, October 7, 2020 - 12:00pm
Online Event/Virtual

 

Registration

Register via Zoom to attend this event live. The event will also be streamed to Facebook.

Artist Statement

By airbrush colorizing and “digitizing” B&W photographic prints, I want to give a sense of oversaturated HDR landscapes. While standing at a distance, where the artwork appears phone size in scale to the viewer, one cannot discern that it is no longer a pic. Neither can the algorithms driving your smartphone’s camera. The analog artifacting I create is digitally airbrushed out, dismissed by the machine.

Neo-Impressionist Divisionist painters, notably Georges Seurat, upset the status quo of the “classically” trained painters who populated the Salon in the late nineteenth century. Seurat’s Sunday Afternoon was a labor of refined technique, and forever cemented him and his art with Pointillism. Just as the airbrush has led to my own visual aesthetic. During Seurat’s time, photography as a medium was fighting to legitimize its place in Fine Art. By being able to capture the extreme detail and accuracy that painters spent a lifetime practicing their technique to achieve, the photographer could reproduce in the “Blink of an Eye” the picturesque landscape that lay before the painter. As a photographer, I seek to capture the Pointillist painting technique with airbrushed photographs.

Traversing the line between painter and photographer. I take landscapes of the surrounding Pacific Northwest. A critique on how easily something can be dismissed as the viewer swipes. Replicating the Screen with a screen. Creating an artwork that cannot be resolved without pause, cannot be duplicated, and certainly is not immediate. The outsider looking in, refusing to seek shelter in the familiar, or fit in the crowd. Freeing oneself of the expected, hanging on the edge of a cliff between the high and low, the liked, or dismissed.

Image: Looking Thru A Screen III. Acrylic ink airbrushed on digital inkjet print / 50 x 64 in.

Artist Talk Series, Fall 2020

This fall the Western Gallery will be showcasing the culminating work of the 10 Bachelor of Fine Arts ("BFA") artists from the 2020 Spring cohort in the exhibition "In-Site: A New Realism." Due to the pandemic, this exhibition was postponed from the spring quarter to the fall of 2020. We are pleased to install the dynamic bodies of work that exemplify the perseverance of the artists during a challenging final spring quarter.

The week of Oct. 5, the exhibiting artists will give talks accessible via Zoom and Facebook Live. We invite the community to join these virtual presentations. We will host a Q & A with the artist in the gallery as part of the presentation. To join us for the talks, please register for the talks by selecting any of the events listed on this page. Each event will have a registration link.